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Glucoraphanin And Other Glucosinolates In Heads Of Broccoli Cultivars (pp. 33-46) $100.00
Authors:  (Mark W. Farnham and Sandra E. Branham, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC, USA)
Abstract:
Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) emerged as an increasingly popular
vegetable of North American consumers during the second half of the 20th Century, with
per capita consumption increasing nearly eight fold during this period. Likewise,
production and consumption of broccoli has also increased in Europe and Asia in recent
decades. The discovery in 1992 that broccoli heads contain sulforaphane, an
isothiocyanate breakdown product thant induces anticarcinogenic protective enzymes in
mammalian cells, has stimulated consumer recognition of broccoli as a health-promoting
vegetable and likely stimulated increased consumption of this vegetable through present
day. This chapter summarizes the results of studies that have examined the concentrations
of glucosinolates in broccoli heads harvested from known cultivars grown in field
studies. Based on those results, we present best estimates of the concentrations of specific
compounds like glucoraphanin, glucoiberin, and glucobrassicin that could be expected in
broccoli heads purchased by consumers. The importance of genotype as a factor
influencing glucosinolate levels is also considered based on results of studies that have
examined this. Breeding approaches aimed at enhancing levels of glucoraphanin and
progress toward that goal are also presented. Lastly, broccoli seed, which has been shown
to contain high levels of glucoraphanin and also glucoiberin, is examined as a potential
valuable source for delivery of these glucosinolates. 


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Glucoraphanin And Other Glucosinolates In Heads Of Broccoli Cultivars (pp. 33-46)