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Time Structures (Chronomes) of the Blood Circulation, Populations' Health, Human Affairs and Space Weather(pp. 73-114) $45.00
Authors:  (Franz Halberg, Germaine Cornelissen, Rollin McCraty, Jerzy Czaplicki, and Abdullah A. Al-Abdulgader)
Abstract:
We complement an "Extended Consensus" [1], focused on the individual's health, by documenting associations between the human heart and circulation and the environment near and far at the level of local and global populations in both space and time [2, 3]. Life in the atmosphere of the sun [4] mimics its inanimate surroundings; its rhythmic components nearly match in length the cycles of the cosmos [5-15]. Longitudinal records of the human blood circulation reveal heretofore unrecognized aspects of its variability. The view from a very few long and relatively dense series, covering mostly around-the-clock (up to) decades on individuals, reveals variability that cannot readily or necessarily be found in hundreds of thousands of individuals' around-the-clock 24-hour spotchecks and certainly not in single samples, unless the individuals' cycles are synchronized and assessed on a population basis. Periods, , longer than 28 hours, that is infradian variations, like the circadians (with tentatively between 20 and 28 hours), have entered the genome and their characteristics await mapping. For those cycles that are already mapped, we consider further the extent to which the parameters and nonparametric endpoints of healthy infradian and circadian variability and their anomalies can become everyday measures of Sir William Osler's wear and tear, i.e., of Hans Selye's and Paul Rosch's stress and strain to the point of becoming gauges of distress (again complementing or replacing single samples or the mean values of dense sampling during single days). Criteria for recognizing and quantifying the alteration indicating when a load changes from benetensive to maletensive have yet to be identified, perhaps by monitoring blood pressure and heart rate in everyday life, replacing spotchecks in the clinic. The probable role of cosmos-induced loads in pathogenesis, assessed, among others, as an effect of a magnetic storm in laboratory animals [16-18] and in humans [19], awaits study by using superposed epochs and a subtraction and addition approach [2, 3]. 


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Time Structures (Chronomes) of the Blood Circulation, Populations' Health, Human Affairs and Space Weather(pp. 73-114)