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PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF FINCHES AND SPARROWS $0.00
Authors:  Antonio Arnaiz-Villena, Pablo Gomez-Prieto and Valentin Ruiz-del-Valle
Abstract:
Fringillidae finches form a subfamily of songbirds (Passeriformes), which are
presently distributed around the world. This subfamily includes canaries, goldfinches,
greenfinches, rosefinches, and grosbeaks, among others. Molecular phylogenies obtained
with mitochondrial DNA sequences show that these groups of finches are put together,
but with some polytomies that have apparently evolved or radiated in parallel. The time
of appearance on Earth of all studied groups is suggested to start after Middle Miocene
Epoch, around 10 million years ago.
Greenfinches (genus Carduelis) may have originated at Eurasian desert margins
coming from Rhodopechys obsoleta (dessert finch) or an extinct pale plumage ancestor; it
later acquired green plumage suitable for the greenfinch ecological niche, i.e.: woods.
Multicolored Eurasian goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) has a genetic extant ancestor, the
green-feathered Carduelis citrinella (citril finch); this was thought to be a canary on
phonotypical bases, but it is now included within goldfinches by our molecular genetics
phylograms. Speciation events between citril finch and Eurasian goldfinch are related
with the Mediterranean Messinian salinity crisis (5 million years ago). Linurgus olivaceus
(oriole finch) is presently thriving in Equatorial Africa and was included in a separate
genus (Linurgus) by itself on phenotypical bases. Our phylograms demonstrate that it is
and old canary.
Proposed genus Acanthis does not exist. Twite and linnet form a separate radiation
from redpolls. Loxia (crossbills) is an evolutive radiation which includes redpolls also. In
North America, three Carduelis radiations are found all coming from the Eurasian siskin: 1)
that of American goldfinch, 2) the pine siskin one, and 3) the Carduelis notata one,
ancestor of all South American siskins. 


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