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01.Coaches’ and Elite Team Players’ Perception and Experiencing of Collective Collapse (pp. 57-74 )
02.Different Effects of Activity- and Purpose-Related Incentives on Commitment and Well-Being in the Domain of Sports (pp. 1-20 )
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Establishing a Hierarchy of Psychological Skills: Coaches’, Athletic Trainers’, and Psychologists' Uses and Perceptions of Psychological Skills Training (pp. 75-94) $25.00
Authors:  Samuel J. Zizzi, Lindsey C. Blom, Jack C. Watson II, V. Paul Downey, and John Geer
Abstract:
As applied sport psychology continues to grow, a variety of professionals may attempt to teach athletes mental skills; however, there is little research to suggest which skills professionals may be qualified to use with their clients. This research examined sport professionals’ use of psychological skills training (PST) and their previous training, self-efficacy, and perceptions of each skill. After a national survey, the final sample included 54 athletic trainers, 64 coaches, and 50 licensed psychologists (n = 168). Psychologists reported using hypnosis and self-talk more frequently than ATCs and coaches, while coaches reported using team building and time management most often. Participants perceived hypnosis, energy management, imagery, and cognitive restructuring to require the most training out of the nine skills. These results are discussed within the context of developing a hierarchy of psychological skill used to guide professionals in their future work. 


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Establishing a Hierarchy of Psychological Skills: Coaches’, Athletic Trainers’, and Psychologists' Uses and Perceptions of Psychological Skills Training (pp. 75-94)